Wednesday, March 5, 2014

Save the Date!

Save the date for the 2015 conference, to be held February 5-6, 2015 at the Hilton Garden Inn, in Manhattan.

Thursday, January 30, 2014


A comprehensive program for farm owners, partners and rookies awaits women involved in agriculture February 13 and 14 in Manhattan, Kan.

Women have always been an integral part of American agriculture but never more than today. The Women Managing the Farm Conference, Feb. 13 and 14 in Manhattan, Kan., will provide educational and networking opportunities for women involved in all facets of the nation’s most essential industry.

With an agenda as diverse as women in agriculture themselves, the conference begins with registration at 8 a.m. on Thursday, Feb. 13, and adjourns at 2 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 14. All activities will be held at Manhattan’s Hilton Garden Inn.

This year’s conference theme is “The Heart of Agriculture,” an apt motif as the conference spans Valentine’s Day.

General Session Speakers include: • Mitch Holthus, well known as the "Voice of the Kansas City Chiefs"
• Clinical psychologist and New York Times best-selling author Dr. Harriet Lerner
• Rick McNary, who will inspire attendees with his thoughts on leadership, faith and life, art and creativity. The author of “Hunger Bites,” McNary also founded an organization that provided food relief in Haiti.
• Daryl Buchholz, Kansas State University Associate Director for Extension and Applied Research
• Gregg Hadley, Kansas State University Assistant Director, Agriculture, Natural Resources and Community Development.

Breakout sessions will tackle diverse but specific issues such as financial, business management, legal and communication topics. Each session will feature experienced professionals who will share their expertise and insight.

The conference will also feature vendor exhibits.

The early bird registration fee for Women Managing the Farm Conference is $145 prior by February 5. After that date, the registration fee will be $170.

Wednesday, January 15, 2014

Women Managing the Farm Conference

A comprehensive program for farm owners, partners and rookies awaits women involved in agriculture February 13 and 14 in Manhattan, Kan.

Women have always been an integral part of American agriculture but never more than today. The Women Managing the Farm Conference, Feb. 13 and 14 in Manhattan, Kan., will provide educational and networking opportunities for women involved in all facets of the nation’s most essential industry.

With an agenda as diverse as women in agriculture themselves, the conference begins with registration at 8 a.m. on Thursday, Feb. 13, and adjourns at 2 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 14. All activities will be held at Manhattan’s Hilton Garden Inn.

This year’s conference theme is “The Heart of Agriculture,” an apt motif, according to one of the conference’s organizers.

“The conference being on Valentine’s Day lends an immediate connection to women’s hearts,” said Janet Barrows, Vice-President of Marketing & Communications, Frontier Farm Credit, and Women Managing the Farm Conference Chair. “Women really are the heart of agriculture. They are at the heart of business matters and often keep families connected. They are often in agriculture either because they love agriculture or love someone who is involved in a farm or ranch.”

The event’s Thursday luncheon speaker will be Gregg Hadley, Kansas State University Assistant Director, Agriculture, Natural Resources and Community Development.

Hadley, who is also the co-chair of the conference, says the event will aid women in meeting the challenges and capturing the opportunities ahead. He cites a backdrop of an ever-increasing world population, decreasing arable land, shrinking freshwater reserves, a rural exodus and many other increasingly complex issues facing rural families as they prepare to pass on their agricultural tradition to a new generation.

“The next 25 years could be the most opportunistic and the most challenging for Kansas farmers and ranchers,” Hadley says. “Are you and your family prepared for these challenges? This conference is designed to provide you with the knowledge needed to overcome these challenges and prepare your family and your farm or ranch to seize the opportunities agriculture will offer in the future.”

Mitch Holthus, well known as the voice of the Kansas City Chiefs, will present “The Heart of a Champion,” the veteran broadcaster’s life-changing prescription for self-healing cardiac care.

Clinical psychologist and New York Times best-selling author Dr. Harriet Lerner will share her expertise. The internationally renowned lecturer is one of the world’s most respected authorities on the psychology of women and family relationships.

Having traveled a life-road that has included being a cowboy, carpenter, minister and, more recently, a writer, photographer and speaker, Rick McNary will inspire attendees with his thoughts on leadership, faith and life, art and creativity. The author of “Hunger Bites,” McNary also founded an organization that provided food relief in Haiti.

A variety of networking sessions during the conference will connect women with similar farming roles to provide a shared learning experience for all participants. From women who share farm responsibilities and tasks equally with husbands or partners to absentee landowners and women who are involved part of the time or only in certain areas, the networking sessions will deliver a valuable learn-from-each-other experience.

Breakout sessions will tackle diverse but specific issues such as financial, business management, legal and communication topics. Each session will feature experienced professionals who will share their expertise and insight.

The conference will also feature vendor exhibits. For information about sponsorship and exhibit opportunities, call 785-532-5569.

The early bird registration fee for Women Managing the Farm Conference is $145 through Feb. 5. After that date, the registration fee will be $170.

Online registration is available at www.womenmanagingthefarm.info.

A printable registration form is also available at that site. Phone registrations can also be made by calling 785-532-5569 or 800-432-8222. Persons interested in attending the conference can also get more information at those access locations.

For a complete conference schedule and agenda, go to www.womenmanagingthefarm.info. Room reservations can be made by calling the Hilton Garden Inn at 785-532-9116.

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CONTACT: Janet Barrows, janet.barrows@frontierfarmcredit.com, 785-789-4238
Gregg Hadley, ghadley@ksu.edu, 785-532-5838
Debbie Hagenmaier, debbieh@ksu.edu, 785-532-2560

Tuesday, April 16, 2013

Agribusiness Offers Leadership Opportunities for Women

***To look at other news releases, check out our web page at http://www.ksre.ksu.edu/news

Released: April 16, 2013

Agribusiness Offers Leadership Opportunities for Women
Women Encouraged to Be Creative, Think Like Entrepreneurs

MANHATTAN, Kan. – A Kansas State University agricultural economist is optimistic about agriculture, which, he claims, “is the only business that will not go out of business.”

He’s also enthusiastic about opportunities for women to fulfill leading roles in the success of agribusiness.

As a featured speaker at the 2013 edition of the “Women Managing the Farm Conference” held in Manhattan, Kan. recently, Vincent Amanor-Boadu challenged the more than 200 women attending the conference to be creative and think like entrepreneurs.

Amanor-Boadu, who has earned distinction as a faculty member in the Department of Agricultural Economics in the College of Agriculture at K-State, sees opportunity for Kansans and agribusiness.

“In the U.S., in the last 60 to 70 years, agriculture has proven to be the most productive segment of the economy,” Amanor-Boadu said. “Input has remained virtually the same, yet production has more than doubled.”

He cited politics, technology (including improved seed, genetics and equipment), and globalization as primary factors in driving growth in agribusiness.

Amanor-Boadu expects continuing growth with new opportunities, and noted that “the consumer is changing, and demanding more from food producers.”

As global consumers enjoy increased economic success – with China moving towards achieving about $5,000 per capita income per year – they typically consume more protein, and that includes lean meats. Those who prefer whole grains consume more grains and are demanding higher quality grains, he said.

Kansas is positioned to capitalize on such trends, said Amanor-Boadu, who predicted that there will be more opportunities for women to lead agribusinesses.

More women than men are currently going to college; they’re learning about agribusiness, building leadership skills, and moving into leadership and management positions, he said.

More women also are choosing careers in agriculture, and they may work as food producers, farm and ranch managers, in crops, soils, plant, animal, food and nutritional sciences, horticulture, new product development, strategic planning, marketing, management, and other careers.

The need to satisfy preferences in a changing world, yet also serve the growing world population will bring opportunities, said Amanor-Boadu, who suggested that successful agribusiness professionals also will need to be open to new ideas.

“Opportunities for growth and development should be plentiful,” he said, adding that he  encourages women to consider the larger global market, learn to identify emerging trends and glean ideas from others’ successes.

He cited innovative technology companies that have a track record of introducing new products and success in sales as a good source for inspiration and ideas that could be applicable in agribusiness.

Amanor-Boadu also encouraged women to take advantage of educational opportunities at K-State and in the College of Agriculture.

One example, he said, is the MAST Program in Agricultural Economics. MAST stands for management, analysis, and strategic thinking, via an executive level class that combines on-campus sessions with distance education. Participants are encouraged to apply such lessons in today’s world while also looking toward the future, and to build and practice leadership skills during the two-year program.

More information on the 2013-14 MAST program is available at www.agmanager.info/mast/.

Women should also attend short courses and field days, as well as K-State’s annual Ag Profitability and Risk and Profit conferences to expand their knowledge about farm and land management and production, the agricultural economist said.

A calendar of educational opportunities through K-State Research and Extension is available at: http://www.ksre.ksu.edu/news/story/hort_ag041013.aspx.

The 2014 Women Managing the Farm Conference is scheduled Feb. 13-14 in Manhattan, Kan. Information about the conference will be posted at www.womenmanagingthefarm.blogspot.com  as it becomes available.

                                                -30-

K-State Research and Extension is a short name for the Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service, a program designed to generate and distribute useful knowledge for the well-being of Kansans. Supported by county, state, federal and private funds, the program has county Extension offices, experiment fields, area Extension offices and regional research centers statewide. Its headquarters is on the K-State campus in Manhattan.


Story by:
Nancy B. Peterson
nancyp@ksu.edu or 785-532-1161
K-State Research and Extension News Media Services
www.ksre.ksu.edu/news


For more information, contact:
Vincent Amanor-Boadu is at 785-532-3520 or vincent@ksu.edu

Friday, February 1, 2013

Ag Conference to Focus on Success in Changing World

Click Here to Download the News Release

Released: January 23, 2013

Ag Conference to Focus on Success in Changing World
Educational Speakers lined-up with valuable information

Friday, January 4, 2013

Women’s Ag Conference Announced - 2013 Press Release

Click Here to Download the News Release
Released: Dec. 21, 2012
Women’s Ag Conference Announced

Registration for Popular Conference Now Open

Sunday, October 28, 2012

2013 Speaker: Jolene Brown


If We Huff and We Puff Will We Blow Your House Down?™

This drives me nuts!
Many times the senior generation of a family business says... “After we’re gone, we just want two things. We want all of our children to get along and we want everyone to be happy.” Then they add, “So we’re going to let our children decide how we should divide our estate.” My reply? “What!? Deciding the distribution of your estate is your job, not that of your children. And, if you want them happy and getting along, then you have some important work to do right now.”

We’ll learn the four things parents owe their children. And by the way, it’s not a business!

 

The Balancing Act: 10 Ideas to Relieve Stress and Bring Renewal to Our Farm and Family Life

We balance soil fertility, feed rations, tires and our checkbooks. We overwork, overwhelm and overload ourselves. Something's wrong with this picture!  It's time we learn 10 realistic and applicable ideas to help bring a breath of fresh air, renewal and balance to our work and family life. 

This presentation includes:
  • Three benchmarks to check your "balance"
  • Realistic mini-breaks that renew and bring a smile
  • Seven balancing lessons from continuously productive people
  • Two tests to define "urgent" and "crisis"
  • Four celebration actions to build energy, spirit and good health


Jolene Brown encourages, teaches and celebrates those who feed, clothe and fuel the world. She brings humor, hope and helpful ideas to the people of agriculture.TM
www.JoleneBrown.com